Was North Korea’s Vital ‘Transformation Computer’ Taken In Raid On Madrid Embassy?

David Maxwell Comment: “Even more curiouser and curiouser.  I am sure some will use this as “evidence” of US complicity in or direction of this “operation.”  But if Thae is correct how will we exploit these computer codes.  I wonder what the Germans would have done in WWII if they knew Engima was compromised.  Won’t north Korea adapt and move to an alternate encryption system?
 
I am sure “transformation computer” is a translation issue,  Thae must mean the north’s secure communications equipment.  I would be interested; however, in seeing the regime’s “transformation plans.”  Do they include denuclearization of the north or do they include continued planning for the Gerrilla Dynasty and Gulag State to achieve unification by “absorbing” the South?”
 
Excerpts:
According to Spanish authorities, at least 10 men carrying replica weapons entered the embassy and tied up staff before gathering up computers and employees’ mobile telephones.
 
“The world is reporting on the attack on the North Korean embassy in Madrid, but North Korea has been keeping quiet over the incident for a month,” Mr Thae said in his blog. “I believe this is because [the attackers] stole the ‘transformation computer’, a core classified item in the embassy.
 
“In a North Korean embassy, the transformation computer is considered more important than human lives and it deciphers telegrams shared between Pyongyang and the embassy overseas”, he said.
 
North Korea uses a code that is based on pages and words from novels that only the sender and the recipient know, Mr Thae said, making it impossible for Western intelligence agencies to break.

Was North Korea’s vital ‘transformation computer’ taken in raid on Madrid embassy?

The Telegraph · by Julian Ryall · March 26, 2019

The group of men who briefly took control of the North Korean embassy in Madrid in February are believed to have made off with vital decryption computers that Pyongyang needs to communicate with its diplomatic missions and agents overseas, according to a former North Korean diplomat.

Thae Yong-ho, who was the deputy head of the North Korean embassy in Londonuntil he defected with his family in 2016, said in a post on his website that the “transformation computer” that was apparently taken “is considered more important than human lives”.

The loss of the equipment potentially compromises the unbreakable code that Pyongyang uses to relay its orders overseas, Mr Thae said, and would “critically harm” the regime.

No group has taken the credit for the attack on the North Korean mission in Madrid on February 22, although there have been suggestions that it was carried out by a shadowy organisation called the Cheollima Civil Defence, which has declared itself to be a government in exile. Also known as Free Jeoson, it claims to be planning the overthrow of the government of Kim Jong-un.

Reports in the Spanish media have also claimed that at least two of the individuals who took part in the raid had links to the CIA, although analysts say that is unlikely given the timing of the incident, just days before Donald Trump, the US president, met Kim in Hanoi.

A woman walks past North Korea’s embassy in Madrid, Spain Credit: AP

According to Spanish authorities, at least 10 men carrying replica weapons entered the embassy and tied up staff before gathering up computers and employees’ mobile telephones.

“The world is reporting on the attack on the North Korean embassy in Madrid, but North Korea has been keeping quiet over the incident for a month,” Mr Thae said in his blog. “I believe this is because [the attackers] stole the ‘transformation computer’, a core classified item in the embassy.

“In a North Korean embassy, the transformation computer is considered more important than human lives and it deciphers telegrams shared between Pyongyang and the embassy overseas”, he said.

North Korea uses a code that is based on pages and words from novels that only the sender and the recipient know, Mr Thae said, making it impossible for Western intelligence agencies to break.

If, however, the program that contains the key to the code can be provided to cryptoanalysts then it would be relatively straightforward to read North Korea’s messages, he said. And if its codes are broken, then North Korea must replace its entire method of communication, which will take time and interfere with its ability to interface with its diplomats.

Mr Thae’s suspicions are supported by the North Korean government summoning its three most important ambassadors – to Beijing, Moscow and the United Nations – to Pyongyang last week for discussions.

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The Telegraph · by Julian Ryall · March 26, 2019

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